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JamieBeu

Books with a Beu

Jamie Beu, owner and co-author (with his wife) of CatholicFamily.info, is a "cradle Catholic", devoted husband, and father of two girls. He is a regular contributor to his parish newsletter, as well as an impassioned defender of the faith who is able to both support and challenge others as necessary -- all in an effort to build-up Christ's Kingdom on Earth. To this end, he does a lot of reading - not just of religious books (for education and research), but also of secular books, both to decompress as well as to keep a finger on the pulse of pop culture (the better to relate to others, as well as to help restore the culture).

Currently reading

Strong Fathers, Strong Daughters: 10 Secrets Every Father Should Know
Meg Meeker, Meg Meeker
Hyperion
Dan Simmons
Boundaries: When to Say Yes, How to Say No to Take Control of Your Life
'John Townsend', 'Henry Cloud'
Boundaries Face to Face: How to Have That Difficult Conversation You've Been Avoiding
Henry Cloud
Jesus of Nazareth
Pope Benedict XVI, Adrian J. Walker
Permutation City
Greg Egan
Truth and Tolerance: Christian Belief and World Religions
Pope Benedict XVI
Is Jesus Coming Soon?: A Catholic Perspective on the Second Coming
Ralph Martin
Prelude to Foundation (Foundation: Prequel, #1)
Isaac Asimov
Autobiography of a Saint: Therese of Lisieux
Thérèse de Lisieux, Ronald A. Knox, Vernon Johnson

Timeriders

TimeRiders - Alex Scarrow This book had such promise... but then screwed it up by "dumbing down" to be understood by YA readers. Unfortunately, they forgot that young adults are actually capable of understanding things like: paradoxes and literary inconsistencies.

The worst of it is that there is a "time bubble", within which the time travelers are safe from the looping of the same few days and the effects of changes in the timeline... EXCEPT for the one girl who is standing outside "when" the timeline got changed by a bunch of military types traveling to WWII.

So, wait - some people in the future travel to the past and change it, so that someone stuck repeating September 10th and 11th sees changes happen all of a sudden?!? Why, oh why, do writers of YA literature continue to get away with not thinking through all that they are writing about, simply because "it's for teens, and teens don't think too deeply, so we can get away with writing crap and getting paid for it."?

I think that if I allowed my children to read this, they would be insulted that I would think this is a good book for them to read.

I could not continue reading this book, so it was returned to the library, eternally unfinished (at least, by me).